Research in the HOAL / Erosion
14 Februar 2020

New "Modified H-Flumes"

Around the start of this year the disicion was made to install new measuring weirs. These...


21 November 2019

Shallow core drilling to confirm the occurence of biogeochemical hotspots delineated with geophysical imaging

On 14th of November, two boreholes with depths of 8 and 6 m respectively, were drilled at...


06 June 2019

Visit of "Vienna Doctoral Programme" students

On the 5th of June, a group of students of the Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource...


17 April 2019

Maintenance at the weather station

On 17th of April there was a big maintenance at the HOAL weather station with repairing...


15 April 2019

Professor Thomas Dunne visiting the HOAL

Professor Thomas Dunne is an expert of fluvial geomorphology and hydrology, working at the...


Science Questions – What are the Space-Time Patterns of Erosion and Sediment Transport Processes?

Knowledge about the sources of sediments is very relevant for managing contaminants such as phosphorus and for controlling soil loss from agricultural landscapes. During infiltration excess overland flow events in the HOAL, sheet, rill and gully erosion may occur on the fields that are poorly covered by crops, but sedimentation immediately occurs when the sediment laden water enters a field with better cover.

Turbidity is monitored at various locations in the HOAL along with autosamplers to be able to calibrate the sediment-turbidity relationships for each event separately. Aerial photographs are taken to identify erosion patterns and calculate eroded soil volumes after erosive rainfall events.

To understand sediment deposition and resuspension in the stream, repeated resuspension experiments were conducted, where sediment-free water was pumped into the source of the stream and flow rates, sediment and solute concentrations as well as grain size distributions were measured. The experiments are complemented by numerical modelling.